1.1 Configure Hardware Settings

6Jan - by qkim0x01 - 0 - In /Linux_Admin_Note
101. System Architecture

This is a note I made while I was reading a book about Linux

@ : Command, + : File

 

  • Determine and Configure Hardware Settings

 

  •  BIOS
    • – Date and time
    • – Disks and boot devices

 

  •  + /proc
    • – which resources the existing devices are using

 

  •  USB
    • – USB Topology
      • @ lsusb -t
    • – USB Controllers
      • – OHCI
      • – UHCI
      • – EHCI
    • – USB Devices (Several classes)
      • – Human Interface Devices (HID) – Communication Device
      • – Mass storage device – Audio – IrDA – Printer
    • – USB Drivers
      • – Host controller drivers
      • – Class drivers
      • – Other device drivers
    • – Several layers
      • – usbcore.o – bottom
      • – check modules
    • – USB Hotplug
      • – usb modules loaded by /sbin/hotplug

 

  • Reporting your hardware
    • @ lsdev
      • – Display indormation about system’s hardware
        • – interrupt address, I/O ports
      • – useful for obtaining information prior to installing devices
        • – May have hardware addressing conflicts
          • – ex) ISA devices
      • @ lspci -t -vv

 

  • Manipulating Modules
    • @ lsmod
      •  == /proc/modules
      • – /lib/modules/…/net
    • @ rmmod
    • @ insmod -s -v
    • @ modinfo -a -d -p
    • @ modprobe -a -c -l -r -s -t -v

 

  • Device Management Definitions
    • – Hotplug, Coldplug
    • – sysfs
      • – RAM-based filesystem
      • – provide kernel data structure, their attributes, and linkage between them and userspace
      • – showing available hardware devices and attributes of the modules/drivers
      • @ mount -t sysfs sysfs /sys
        • – udev process uses sysfs to get information
          • + /etc/udev.d
            • – rules to apply when adding removing devices
      • – D-bus
        • – an application usees sysfs to implement a message bus daemon
        • – used for broadcasting system events, and is normally launched by an init script called messagebus
        • – a hald process is the daemon that maintains a databse of the devices connected to the system in real time
          • – The daemon connects to the D-Bus system messagebus
            • – provide an API that applications can use to discover, monitor, and invoke operations on devices

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